Rounds

News and notes on guns in America

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[AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais]

Daily Bulletin: Powerful Democrat Seeks Documents From NRA in New Trumpworld Probe

Good morning, Bulletin readers. We’ve updated our guide to all the known congressional investigations into the NRA to include a sweeping probe of Trumpworld launched by the House Judiciary Committee yesterday. Plus, a look at the YouTubers reporting on gang violence, despite the risks.

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The NRA is among the targets of a broad congressional investigation into Trump’s associates. Representative Jerry Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, on Monday sent more than 80 document requests to members of the president’s inner circle. One of the missives was addressed to Wayne LaPierre and the National Rifle Association. The probe is looking into possible “obstruction of justice, public corruption, and other abuses of power,” according to Nadler’s letters. This brings the total number of active congressional inquiries into the gun rights group to six. We’re keeping tabs on all of them in this handy guide.

Despite research showing otherwise, Trump’s nominee to head the Office of Violence Against Women believes arming women protects them against domestic violence. Shannon Lee Goessling, a former Florida prosecutor, has a congressional confirmation hearing today. She filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court case District of Columbia v. Heller, which established the individual right to gun ownership, arguing that armed women are less likely to be assaulted. Jennifer Mascia rounds up the evidence against that claim.

Ohio teachers who carry guns in schools don’t need as many hours of training as police, a judge ruled. The decision last week was a blow to parents who filed a suit challenging the Madison Local School District’s policy of allowing armed school staff on campus with just 27 hours of training, compared to the more than 700 hours of training required for local law enforcement officers. The school board has already authorized at least 10 school staff members to carry weapons in school.

Teenage boys with supportive parents are less likely to carry guns. A new report in Pediatrics documents the efforts of researchers who followed more than 500 boys from Pittsburgh public schools from first grade through age 20 to study the connections between parenting and gun carrying.

New York lawmakers voted to expand the state’s safe storage law. It is already a misdemeanor to store unlocked weapons in homes where people prohibited from gun ownership live. The new proposal, which is headed for the governor’s desk, would expand that law to cover homes with children under 16 years old. From The Trace archives: Gun owners in 27 states can face penalties for letting their weapons fall into the hands of a minor, but the laws are rarely enforced.

There were three mass shootings last weekend. That’s according to Gun Violence Archive, which defines a mass shooting as any incident in which four or more people are killed or injured. Early on Sunday, four people were wounded in a shooting during a birthday party at a sports bar in Oakland, California. The gunfire stemmed from an argument between two men. The same night, six people were injured after shots were fired at a private lounge in Chicago. Witnesses told police they were dancing when the gunfire erupted, sending multiple people to the ground. And late Saturday evening, one person died and three others were wounded in a drive-by shooting after a house party in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

ONE LAST THING

YouTube videographers cover a side of gun culture other journalists can’t access. The Associated Press has an eye-opening story on a popular genre of online video that documents gun violence on the front lines through interviews with people involved in gang life. The videos fill a gap in mainstream crime reporting, but they come with significant risks. After a pioneer of the form was killed in a drive-by shooting last year in Chicago, other videographers have realized the dangers associated with their reporting. “I think every day about getting shot,” said a man who now carries a weapon with him while producing stories for his channel.