Rounds

News and notes on guns in America

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Daily Bulletin: Another Mass Shooting Hit Texas. Then Gunfire Erupted at a Vigil for One of the Victims.

Good morning, Bulletin readers. Thousands paid their respects at the Tree of Life Synagogue on the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting there. That story and more in your Monday roundup.

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WHAT TO KNOW TODAY

Texas’s latest mass shooting strikes a college community. Police say someone opened fire with a handgun late Saturday at event space in the town of Greenville, 50 miles northeast of Dallas, killing two people and leaving six others with bullet wounds. Approximately 750 people, most of them in their teens or early 20s, were at the party, with some turning out to celebrate homecoming weekend at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Six additional victims were injured in the chaos. Gunfire erupted again at a vigil for one of the victims. No one was struck, but several vehicles were found with bullet holes, including one belonging to a local news crewThe perpetrator remains unknown. Police say they are frustrated that witnesses have not offered more detail on the shooter, who may have been targeting a specific victim.

A man opened fire at a Walmart in Georgia. The 19-year-old suspect fired shots in a Walmart in Waycross early Saturday. He killed himself when confronted by police, who arrived within a minute.

NEW from THE TRACE: Anti-violence leaders blast Chicago mayor’s budget plan. For months, more than two dozen organizations have been pressing city leaders to set aside $50 million for community-based violence prevention efforts. But when Mayor Lori Lightfoot unveiled next year’s budget proposal last week, she indicated that she was seeking a fraction of that amount — $9 million. “This was her first opportunity to show that she is truly committed to making Chicago one of the safest cities in America, but she failed at that opportunity,” the Reverend Ciera Walker-Chamberlain told Brian Freskos, who has our report.

Maria Butina is back in Russia. The self-styled Russian gun-rights activist came to the attention of federal law enforcement after making inroads at the National Rifle Association. She served 15 months in prison for acting as an unauthorized agent of the Kremlin and was deported to Moscow upon her release on Friday. U.S. Representative Thomas Massie, a Republican from Kentucky, blamed “Russophobia” for her “ridiculously long” sentence.

Mourners paid their respects at the site of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting. Thousands traveled to the Tree of Life Synagogue, where 11 people were fatally shot on October 27, 2018. Students from locations of other mass shootings — including Littleton, Colorado; Newtown, Connecticut; and Parkland, Florida — created artwork on a wall opposite the building.

A federal court denied compensation to bump stock owners. Owners of the devices, which were outlawed in March, were seeking a combined $500,000 in reimbursement for the bump stocks they were required to destroy.

Education groups say a Republican plan for reducing mass shootings may violate student privacy. Senator John Cornyn’s bill, introduced last week, includes calls for monitoring students’ online activity for signs of potential violence. Privacy experts worry the surveillance could suppress kids’ self-expression.

A Florida Democrat will make another push for expanding gun background checks. State Representative Margaret Good filed a bill for the 2020 legislative session that would require background checks for private gun sales. Good filed similar bills in 2018 and 2019. A companion bill was introduced in the state Senate.

Connecticut police now have gun-detecting K9s. The four police dogs took a six-week course to learn to detect the presence of guns and spent shell casings. The program is the first of its kind in New England.

DATA POINT

On average, a mass shooting occurred in America every 608 days during the 1970s. This decade, a mass public shooting (4+ killed) has occurred once every 20 days. [Rockefeller Institute]